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20130121
20130129
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as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6